Concept

National Socialist Front

Summary
The National Socialist Front (Nationalsocialistisk front, NSF) was at the time of its dissolution the largest Neo-Nazi political party in Sweden. The organization was founded in Karlskrona on 8 August 1994. It became a political party on 20 April 1999, the 110th birthday of Adolf Hitler. The party's official newspaper—now defunct—was named Den Svenske Nationalsocialisten ("The Swedish National Socialist"), also known as Den Svenske ("The Swedish"). The party ran in the municipal council elections in Karlskrona in 2002, but only attracted 0.5% of the votes which was not sufficient for a mandate. In 2006 the party entered the elections at a national level. There it gained 1,417 votes, or 0.03% (in order to enter the Swedish parliament a party needs at least 4% of the total votes). The party was most successful in Trollhättan, where it received 208 votes or 0.65%, although this was not enough to enter the municipal assembly. 2006 was the best election year in the party's history. In 2007 the NSF demonstrated in Stockholm for the release of Holocaust denier Ernst Zündel. The party had as its main goals the abolition of democracy, the repatriation of immigrants, internment of communists into work camps, a repeat of the Holocaust and the implementation of scientific racism and cutting taxes for families with many genetically healthy children. The NSF also launched a campaign to defend Mel Gibson over the criticism he received from Abraham Foxman for making the film The Passion of the Christ. The National Socialist Front had a mandatory political uniform dress code during marches and demonstrations, which included a black combat-sweater or shirt, black military-cap, boots, khaki-coloured combat pants and the party's logo on the arms. This uniform was taken out of use after the police stated in 2006 that it was a hate crime to wear them during demonstrations. The members of the party often wore a blue T-shirt with yellow text that said "NSF" after this.
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