Concept

Oktay Sinanoğlu

Summary
Oktay Sinanoğlu (February 25, 1935 – April 19, 2015) was a Turkish physical chemist and molecular biophysicist who made significant contributions to the theory of electron correlation in molecules, quantum chemistry, and the theory of solvation. Sinanoğlu was born in Bari, Italy on February 25, 1935, to Nüzhet Haşim and Rüveyde (Karacabey) Sinanoğlu. His father was a consular official under the Consul General Atıf Kor in the Bari Consulate of Turkey, and a writer. Following his father's recall to Turkey in July 1938, the family returned to Turkey before the start of World War II. He had a sister, Esin Afşar (1936-2011), who became a well-known singer and actress. Sinanoğlu graduated from TED Ankara Koleji in 1951. He went to the United States in 1953, where he studied in University of California, Berkeley graduating with a BSc degree with highest honors in 1956. The following year, he completed his MSc at MIT (1957), and was awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship. He completed his predoctoral fellowship (1958-1959) and earned his PhD in physical chemistry (1959-1960) from the University of California, Berkeley. On December 21, 1963, Oktay Sinanoğlu married Paula Armbruster, who was doing graduate work at Yale University. The wedding ceremony took place in the Branford College Chapel of Yale. After their later divorce, he remarried to Dilek Sinanoğlu and from this marriage he became the father of twins. The family resided in the Emerald Lakes neighborhood of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and in Istanbul, Turkey. In 1960, Sinanoğlu joined the chemistry department at Yale University. He was appointed full professor of chemistry in 1963. At age 28, he became the youngest full professor in Yale’s 20th-century history. It is believed that he was the third-youngest full professor in the 300-plus year history of Yale University. During his tenure at Yale he wrote a number of papers in various subfields of theoretical chemistry, the most widely cited of which was his 1961 paper on electron correlation.
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