Concept

Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies

Summary
The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) is a graduate school of Johns Hopkins University based in Washington, D.C. with campuses in Bologna, Italy and Nanjing, China. It has consistently been ranked one of the top graduate schools for international relations in the world. Foreign Policy has rated it among the top three programs globally since 2005, earning third, second, and first place across different years' editions. The school is devoted to the study of international relations, diplomacy, national security, economics, and public policy. The school has hosted world leaders on a regular basis for public debate in international affairs. The Nitze School was established in 1943 by Paul H. Nitze and Christian Herter who were seeking new methods of preparing men and women to cope with the international responsibilities that would be thrust upon the United States in the post-World War II world. Nitze feared the diplomatic and economic expertise developed in World War II might get lost if the nation became isolationist. Originally founded as a standalone graduate school, it became a part of Johns Hopkins University in 1950. The SAIS Washington, D.C. campus is located on Massachusetts Avenue NW's Embassy Row, just off Dupont Circle and across from the Brookings Institution and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and next to the Center for Global Development and the Peterson Institute. In fall 2023, the D.C. campus will relocate to the 420,000 square foot 555 Pennsylvania Avenue building, which was purchased by the university in 2019 and has undergone extensive renovation. The Nitze School of Advanced International Studies was established in 1943 by Paul H. Nitze and Christian Herter who were seeking new methods of preparing men and women to cope with the international responsibilities that would be thrust upon the United States in the post-World War II world. Nitze feared the diplomatic and economic expertise developed in World War II might get lost if the nation became isolationist.
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