Concept

Kouprey

Summary
The kouprey (Bos sauveli), also known as the forest ox and grey ox, is a possibly extinct species of forest-dwelling wild bovine native to Southeast Asia. The name kouprey, derived from the Khmer language, means "forest ox". Known in Southeast Asia for thousands of years, the species was only described by Western science in 1937, when a specimen kept at the Parc Zoologique de Paris was described by the French zoologist Achille Urbain. The kouprey is listed as Critically Endangered, and possibly extinct, by the IUCN Red List, with the last confirmed sighting of an individual taking place in 1969. Description Kouprey have a light and gracile build, in comparison to other wild cattle species. Both sexes have notched nostrils and their tails, noticeably longer than those of either gaur or banteng, measure between 3.3 and 3.6 ft. (100–110 cm) long. Calves are born a reddish bay colour, turning grey at around 5 months of age, and the beginnings of horns appea
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