Concept

71st Infantry Division (United States)

Summary
The 71st Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War II. Activated: 15 July 1943 at Camp Carson, Colorado Overseas: 26 January 1945. Campaigns: Rhineland, Central-Europe Days of combat: 62. Awards: DSC-7 ; DSM-1 ; SS-180; LM-1 ; SM-8 ; BSM-695 ; AM-10. Commanders: Brig. Gen. Robert L. Spragins (July 1943 – October 1944), Maj. Gen. Eugene M. Landrum (October–November 1944), Maj. Gen. Willard G. Wyman (November 1944-16 August 1945), Brig. Gen. Onslow S. Rolfe (17 August 1945 – 10 October 1945), Maj. Gen. A. Arnim White (October 1945 – February 1946), Col. William Westmoreland (February–June 1946). Returned to U.S.: 10 March 1946. Inactivated: 12 March 1946 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey Headquarters, 71st Infantry Division 5th Infantry Regiment 14th Infantry Regiment 66th Infantry Regiment Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 71st Infantry Division Artillery 564th Field Artillery Battalion (155 mm) 607th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm) 608th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm) 609th Field Artillery Battalion (105 mm) 271st Engineer Combat Battalion 371st Medical Battalion 71st Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop (Mechanized) Headquarters, Special Troops, 71st Infantry Division Headquarters Company, 71st Infantry Division 771st Ordnance Light Maintenance Company 251st Quartermaster Company 571st Signal Company Military Police Platoon Band 71st Counterintelligence Corps Detachment The division was first organized as the 71st Light Division (Pack, Jungle), intended for use in the mountainous jungle areas of the Pacific theater. Smaller than the standard 14,000-man infantry division, at about 9,000 personnel, its primary means of transport was hundreds of horses and mules controlled by several quartermaster pack companies of muleteers, and for artillery several battalions of 75mm pack howitzers, instead of the standard M2A1 105 mm howitzer, which could be broken down into several loads and carried by mule train.
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