Concept

Morton Halperin

Summary
'Morton H. Halperin' (born June 13, 1938) is a longtime expert on U.S. foreign policy, arms control, civil liberties, and the workings of bureaucracies. He was a senior advisor to the Open Society Foundations, which was founded by George Soros. He served in the Johnson, Nixon, Clinton, and Obama administrations. He has taught at Harvard University and as a visitor at other universities including Columbia, George Washington University, and Yale. He has served in a number of roles with think tanks, including the Center for American Progress, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Twentieth Century Fund. Halperin was born to a Jewish family on June 13, 1938, in Brooklyn, New York. He graduated from Lafayette High School in Brooklyn and received his BA in political science from Columbia University in 1958. Thereafter, he attended Yale University, where he received an MA in international relations in 1959 and a PhD in the discipline in 1961. Halperin has three sons — David Halperin, Mark Halperin, former senior political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC, and Gary Halperin. He is the brother of Daniel Halperin, the Stanley S. Surrey Professor of Law, Emeritus at Harvard Law School. In 2005, he married Diane Orentlicher, a professor of international law at the American University Washington College of Law. Orentlicher formerly served as a deputy in the Office of War Crimes in the U.S. Department of State. Halperin began his career in academia as a research associate at the Harvard Center for International Affairs (1960–66). He was an instructor in government at Harvard (1961-1963) and an assistant professor of government (1964-1966). From 1966 to 1967, Halperin served as a special assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. At 29-years-old, from 1967 to 1969, he became the youngest ever Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (Policy, Planning, and Arms Control). He joined the National Security Council in 1969 as the director of policy planning.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.