Concept

Edmund Burke School

Summary
Edmund Burke School is an independent college preparatory school in Washington, D.C. Located on Connecticut Avenue NW, two blocks from the Van Ness - UDC metro station, Burke enrolls approximately 315 students in Grades 6–12. Founded in 1968 by Jean Mooskin and Dick Roth, the school practices progressive education: classes and advisory groups are small, teachers go by their first names, and students are given significant independence. The school was named for 18th century British parliamentarian and philosopher Edmund Burke. "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing," a quote often attributed to Burke, serves as a source of inspiration. Edmund Burke School was founded in 1968 by Roth and Mooskin, who met while teaching at the Hawthorne School, which would close in 1982. Burke first opened in a building at 2107 Wyoming Avenue NW and initially enrolled 17 students. Elizabeth Ely, a teacher at Burke when it opened, went on to found The Field School in 1972, and the two schools later became athletic rivals. In 1971, Burke's growth prompted a move to 2120 Wyoming Avenue NW. In 1973, the school purchased 2955 Upton Street NW, which it later expanded to add a gymnasium and other facilities. In 2003, Burke earned city approval to expand its facilities with a new building that would increase both size and capacity and now includes new computer labs, offices, middle school classrooms, athletic facilities, a theater, and an underground parking garage. A new building, dedicated primarily to the Middle School and the arts, connected with the school's longtime home, opened in 2006. In summer 2021, Burke began a renovation to the historic high school building, which will result in a new ceramics studio, renovated space for digital and wet photography, community gathering space, new fitness center, and a lunch servery. Co-founders Mooskin and Roth retired in 1999, and David Shapiro became the Head of School. The current Head of School is Steve McManus.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs

Loading