Concept

Soul theorem

Summary
In mathematics, the soul theorem is a theorem of Riemannian geometry that largely reduces the study of complete manifolds of non-negative sectional curvature to that of the compact case. Jeff Cheeger and Detlef Gromoll proved the theorem in 1972 by generalizing a 1969 result of Gromoll and Wolfgang Meyer. The related soul conjecture, formulated by Cheeger and Gromoll at that time, was proved twenty years later by Grigori Perelman. Soul theorem Cheeger and Gromoll's soul theorem states: :If (M, g) is a complete connected Riemannian manifold with nonnegative sectional curvature, then there exists a closed totally convex, totally geodesic embedded submanifold whose normal bundle is diffeomorphic to M. Such a submanifold is called a soul of (M, g). By the Gauss equation and total geodesicity, the induced Riemannian metric on the soul automatically has nonnegative sectional curvature. Gromoll and Meyer had earlier studied the case of positive sectional curvature, where they show
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