Concept

Liberalism in South Korea

Summary
This article gives an overview of liberalism () and its related history in South Korea. It is limited to liberal parties with substantial support, mainly proven by having had a representation in parliament. Historically, the liberal movement in the South Korean began as a moderate conservative movement against the far-right dictatorship, but in the current political structure of the South Korea, it has become a liberal movement against the conservative movement. The Democratic Party of Korea is a reformist-to-liberal party and is considered centrist. However, in the Korean political context, it is classified as a center-left (or progressive), and there are studies by several experts that it promotes policies that are more right-wing than center-right parties in Western Europe, such as Germany's Christian Democratic Union. Also, the Justice Party is considered a "centre-left to left-wing" party. The party is considered radical progressive or leftist in South Korea, but takes a more moderate stance than the centre-left churches of Western Europe. There are various political positions within South Korean liberals, but they tend to coalesce on certain stances: promoting harmony with North Korea, justice against Japan, and, wherever possible, autonomy from great power interference, including the United States. South Korean liberalism is also based on a national liberalist-independence movement against China and Japan. South Korean liberals support the Sunshine Policy toward North Korea. Centrist reformism The word "liberal" in South Korea is often used in its traditional sense. In South Korea, conservatives also call themselves "liberal" () and "liberal democracy" () in a similar sense to economic liberalism and anti-communism. "Liberals" in the general sense often refer to themselves as "Democrats", "Ribeoreol" (, the Korean pronunciation of the English "liberal") or "Democratic Camps" (). In South Korea, "liberal" () and "progressive" () are political forces with individual traditions, but when translating "liberal" in the United States into Korean language, it is often translated into "progressive".
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs

Loading