Concept

Viral plaque

Summary
A viral plaque is a visible structure formed after introducing a viral sample to a cell culture grown on some nutrient medium. The virus will replicate and spread, generating regions of cell destruction known as plaques. For example, Vero cell or other tissue cultures may be used to investigate an influenza virus or coronavirus, while various bacterial cultures would be used for bacteriophages. Counting the number of plaques can be used as a method of virus quantification. These plaques can sometimes be detected visually using colony counters, in much the same way as bacterial colonies are counted; however, they are not always visible to the naked eye, and sometimes can only be seen through a microscope, or using techniques such as staining (e.g. neutral red for eukaryotes or giemsa for bacteria) or immunofluorescence. Special computer systems have been designed with the ability to scan samples in batches. The appearance of the plaque depends on the host strain, virus and the con
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