Concept

European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal

Summary
The European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal is a military award of the United States Armed Forces which was first created on November 6, 1942, by issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The medal was intended to recognize those military service members who had performed military duty in the European Theater (to include North Africa and the Middle East) during the years of the Second World War. The EAME Campaign Medal was initially established by Executive Order 9265, dated 6 November 1942, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and announced in War Department Bulletin 56, 1942. The European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal was awarded as a service ribbon throughout the entire Second World War due to the ribbon design being approved by the Secretary of War in December 1942. The medal design was submitted to the Commission of Fine Arts on 17 September 1946 and the first sample was completed in July 1947. The first recipient of the European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal was General of the Army Dwight Eisenhower on 24 July 1947 in recognition of his service as Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force during World War II. The criteria were initially announced in Department of the Army (DA) Circular 84, dated 25 March 1948, and subsequently published in Army Regulation 600–65, dated 22 September 1948. The Pacific Theater counterpart to the European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal was the Asiatic–Pacific Campaign Medal. Originally known as the "EAME Ribbon", the European–African–Middle Eastern Campaign Medal is awarded for any service performed between December 7, 1941, and March 2, 1946, inclusive, provided such service was performed in the following geographical theater areas: West boundary. -- From the North Pole, south along the 75th meridian west longitude to the 77th parallel north latitude, thence southeast through Davis Strait to the intersection of the 40th parallel north latitude and the 35th meridian west longitude, thence south along that meridian to the 10th parallel north latitude, thence southeast to the intersection of the equator and the 20th meridian west longitude, thence along the 20th meridian west longitude to the South Pole.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs

Loading