Concept

Owen Luder

Summary
Harold Owen Luder (7 August 1928 – 8 October 2021) was a British architect who designed a number of notable and sometimes controversial buildings in the United Kingdom in the 1960s and 1970s, many now demolished. He served as chairman of the Architects Registration Board and twice as President of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1981–1983 and 1995–1997. He established his own practice Owen Luder Partnership in 1957, and left in 1987 to form the consultancy Communication In Construction. Luder was born in London in 1928, the son of an unknown father and Ellen Clara Mason, who married Edward Charles Luder in 1931. He grew up on the Old Kent Road in south London. As a boy he wanted to design aircraft but after the Second World War decided to become an architect, and trained at the Brixton School of Building. In 1945, he joined the practice of architect Henry C. Smith, before being called up for military service. In the early and mid-1950s, he worked for several small architectural practices, as well as undertaking private work. He set up his own practice, Owen Luder Partnership, in 1957. Hendon Hall Court, London, England. (1963) Eros House, London, England. (1965) Tricorn Centre, Portsmouth, England. (1966) - Demolished in 2004 Trinity Square, Gateshead, England. (1967) - Demolished in 2010 Consort House, London, England. (1970) SouthGate Shopping Centre, Bath, England. (1971) - Demolished in 2007 Derwent Tower, Gateshead, England. (1972) - Demolished in 2012 Catford Shopping Centre, London, England. (1974) Milford Towers, London, England. (1974) Luder's designs included some of the most powerful and raw examples of Brutalist architecture, with massive bare concrete sculptural forms devoid of claddings or decoration – other than their inherent shapes. The British climate, with abundant rain and damp winters, is unkind to such unclad concrete buildings, which rapidly become a shabby grey–brown colour and streaked with marks where rainwater has run down the façades. Poor maintenance has often exacerbated these problems.
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