Concept

Speedcubing

Summary
Speedcubing (also known as speedsolving or cubing) is a competitive sport involving solving a variety of combination puzzles, the most famous being the 3x3x3 puzzle, as quickly as possible. A person who practices solving twisty puzzles competitively is known as a speedcuber (when solved specifically focusing on speed), or a cuber. For most puzzles, solving involves performing a series of moves, known as algorithms, that alter a scrambled puzzle into a solved state. Competitive speedcubing is mainly regulated by the World Cube Association (WCA). The WCA currently recognizes 17 speedcubing events: the cubic puzzles from the 2x2–7x7, the Pyraminx, Megaminx, Skewb, Square-1, and Rubik's Clock, as well as the 3x3, 4x4, and 5x5 Blindfolded, 3x3 One-handed, 3x3 Fewest Moves, and 3x3 Multi-blind. the 3x3x3 world record single in competition is 3.13 seconds, set by Max Park at Pride in Long Beach 2023. The 3x3x3 world record for an average of five solves is 4.48 seconds, set by Yiheng Wang at Mofunland Cruise Open 2023. The Rubik's Cube was invented in 1974 by Hungarian professor of architecture Ernő Rubik (born July 13, 1944). In 1979, Ernő Rubik partnered with Ideal Toy Company to garner widespread international interest in the cube, which soon developed into a global trend. On June 5, 1982, the first world championship was held in Budapest, Hungary. Nineteen people competed in the event, and the American Minh Thai won with a single solve time of 22.95 seconds, which was, at the time, the fastest Rubik's Cube solve ever recorded in the competition. Other notable attendees include Jessica Fridrich and Lars Petrus, both of whom later became influential in the development of solving methods and the speedcubing community. The Rubik's Cube waned in popularity after 1983, but with the advent of the Internet, sites began to surface to discuss the cube. With these websites facilitating the renewed popularity of the cube, it ushered in a new generation of cubers, creating a growing international community of people dedicated to the sport of speedsolving.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs

Loading