Concept

USS Israel

Summary
The first USS Israel (DD-98) was a in the United States Navy during World War I and the years following. Joseph Israel was born c. 1780. He entered the Navy as Midshipman on 15 January 1801. He served on during the Quasi-War with France and on , and during the First Barbary War. Midshipman Israel was killed 4 September 1804 when ketch exploded in the harbor of Tripoli during the night effort to destroy the enemy shipping led by Lieutenant Richard Somers. A monument to the memory of Israel and his fellow officers and men stands on the grounds of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. Israel was reported to be of the Jewish faith, although "there was no evidence that Israel is a Jew or of Jewish ancestry." Israel was launched on 22 June 1918 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts, sponsored by Miss Dorothy Brown. The destroyer was commissioned on 13 September 1918. Following shakedown out of Boston, Israel rendezvoused with the battleship at Newport, Rhode Island on 24 September 1918, and performed escort duty on the East Coast as a unit of the Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet. She departed New York on 13 October with a convoy, and arrived at Gibraltar on 6 November, via the Azores and Port Leixoes, Portugal. Having escorted the Brazilian Detachment to Gibraltar Harbour on 9 November, Israel arrived at Venice on 18 November and joined the Eastern Mediterranean Forces. On 1 April 1919, she was in Spalato, now Split, with and . She operated out of Venice and Split as a station ship transporting supplies and personnel until 12 July 1919 when she departed Villefranche, France, via Gibraltar and the Azores, arriving at Boston on 24 July. While undergoing overhaul at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Israel was fitted out as a light minelayer and her classification changed 17 July 1920 to DM-3. Sailing from Portsmouth, New Hampshire on 4 March 1921, Israel cruised along the East Coast until 5 July when she joined Mine Squadron 1, Atlantic Fleet, at Gloucester, Massachusetts.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs

Loading