Concept

Responsibility assignment matrix

Summary
A responsibility assignment matrix (RAM), also known as RACI matrix (ˈreɪsi) or linear responsibility chart (LRC), describes the participation by various roles in completing tasks or deliverables for a project or business process. RACI is an acronym derived from the four key responsibilities most typically used: responsible, accountable, consulted, and informed. It is used for clarifying and defining roles and responsibilities in cross-functional or departmental projects and processes. There are a number of alternatives to the RACI model. There is a distinction between a role and individually identified people: a role is a descriptor of an associated set of tasks; may be performed by many people; and one person can perform many roles. For example, an organization may have ten people who can perform the role of project manager, although traditionally each project only has one project manager at any one time; and a person who is able to perform the role of project manager may also be able to perform the role of business analyst and tester. R = Responsible (also recommender) Those who do the work to complete the task. There is at least one role with a participation type of responsible, although others can be delegated to assist in the work required. (See also RASCI below for separately identifying those who participate in a supporting role.) A = Accountable (also approver or final approving authority) The one ultimately answerable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, the one who ensures the prerequisites of the task are met and who delegates the work to those responsible. In other words, an accountable must sign off (approve) work that responsible provides. There must be only one accountable specified for each task or deliverable. C = Consulted (sometimes consultant or counsel) Those whose opinions are sought, typically subject-matter experts, and with whom there is two-way communication. I = Informed (also informee) Those who are kept up-to-date on progress, often only on completion of the task or deliverable, and with whom there is just one-way communication.
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