Concept

USS Bergall (SS-320)

Summary
USS Bergall (SS-320), a Balao-class submarine in commission from 1944 to 1958, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for the bergall, a small fish of the New England coast. During World War II she made five war patrols between 8 September 1944 and 17 June 1945, operating in the South China Sea, Java Sea, and Lombok Strait and north of the Malay Barrier. During these patrols she sank two Japanese merchant ships totaling 14,710 gross register tons and one 740-displacement ton Imperial Japanese Navy frigate. She also damaged the Japanese heavy cruiser , which was never repaired. After World War II, Bergall served in the United States Pacific Fleet unti 1950 and made a cruise in Alaskan waters and a deployment to the Far East. She transferred to the United States Atlantic Fleet in 1950 and made cruises along the east coast of North America and to the West Indies, as well as two deployments to the Mediterranean Sea for service in the United States Sixth Fleet. When Bergall′s U.S. Navy career ended, she was transferred to Turkey in 1958 and was commissioned in the Turkish Naval Forces as TCG Turgutreis (S 342). She took part in the Turkish invasion of Cyprus in 1974. She was decommissioned in 1983 and sold for scrap in April 2000. Bergall′s keel was laid down on 13 May 1943 by the Electric Boat Company in Groton, Connecticut. She was launched on 16 February 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Isabel M. Elkins, and commissioned on 12 June 1944 with Lieutenant Commander John M. Hyde in command. Bergall carried out shakedown operations in the waters off New London, Connecticut, and attack training at the torpedo range near Newport, Rhode Island, until 3 July 1944. After returning to Naval Submarine Base New London at Groton, Bergall departed for the war in the Pacific on 16 July 1944. During her voyage to the Panama Canal Zone, she was near Puerto Rico when a United States Army Air Forces training plane crashed into the sea about away. She rescued the plane's crewmen, who were uninjured, and took them to the Panama Canal Zone.
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