Concept

Boothstown

Summary
Boothstown is a suburban village in the City of Salford in Greater Manchester, England. Boothstown forms part of the Boothstown and Ellenbrook ward, which had a population at the 2011 Census of 9,599. The village is within the boundaries of the historic county of Lancashire, west of the City of Salford, bordered to the north by the East Lancashire Road A580 and to the south by the Bridgewater Canal. Historically, it was a hamlet partly in Worsley township in the parish of Eccles, and partly in Tyldesley in the parish of Leigh. Boothstown lies northwest of Salford, northwest of Manchester and southeast of Wigan. Astley is to the west, to the north is Walkden and to the east is Worsley where there is a transport interchange between the M60, M62 and M602 motorways. Once known for its mining community, Boothstown is now a mainly residential area. Evidence of the Romans in this area is that in 1947, workmen digging in Boothstown at discovered a hoard of over 550 bronze Roman coins dating between 259 AD and 278 AD. A second hoard of coins dated 289 - 296 A.D. was found at Boothsbank in 1989. In 1323 the estate or manor of Booths was held by the de Worsley family and remained with that family, held of the king by a rent of 2s, until the reign of Elizabeth I. In the 17th century the manor was held by Charnock and then by Sherington. Booths Old Hall was built about 1343 and New Booths Hall was built in the early-17th century. The hearth-tax returns of 1666 show nearby Wardley Hall was the largest residence with 19 hearths, Worsley Hall and Booths had 17 each. There were 276 hearths in the township, Worsley proper had 191. The house, in the latter part of the 18th century, was owned by the Clowes family who owned Garrett Hall in neighbouring Tyldesley. Lord Francis Egerton bought the estate from Robert Haldane Bradshaw in 1836 and Booths and became part of the Manor of Worsley. In 1795 the Bridgewater Canal was extended from Worsley, through Boothstown to Leigh. The growth of Boothstown was based on coal and cotton.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading

Related MOOCs

Loading