Concept

HMAS Parramatta (D55)

Summary
HMAS Parramatta, named after the Parramatta River, was a River-class torpedo-boat destroyer of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Ordered in 1909 for the Commonwealth Naval Forces (the predecessor of the RAN), Parramatta was the first ship launched for the RAN. Temporarily commissioned into the Royal Navy for the delivery voyage to Australia, the destroyer came under Australian naval control in 1910, and was recommissioned into the RAN on 1 March 1911, shortly before the latter's formal creation. After the beginning of the First World War in 1914 until 1917, Parramatta was conducted patrols in the Pacific and South-East Asia, before she and her sister ships were transferred to the Mediterranean for anti-submarine operations. She returned to Australia in 1919 and was placed in reserve. Apart from a brief period of full commission during the visit of the Prince of Wales in 1920, Parramatta remained in reserve until 1928. She was fully decommissioned in 1928, stripped of parts, and sold for use as prisoner accommodation on the Hawkesbury River. After changing hands several times, the hull ran aground during a gale in 1933, and was left to rust. In 1973, the bow and stern sections were salvaged, and converted into memorials. The Australian River-class destroyers had an overall length of , a beam of and a draft of . They displaced at normal load. The destroyers were powered by one set of Parsons steam turbines that drove three propeller shafts using steam provided by three Yarrow boilers. The turbines were rated at which was designed to give the ships a speed of . During her sea trials, Parramatta was able to achieve . The ships could carry enough fuel oil to give them a range of at a speed of . The ship's company consisted of between 66 and 73 crewmen, including five officers. The ship were armed with a single BL Mk VIII gun in a platform on the forecastle, three 12-pounder () 12 cwt guns in single mounts, one on each broadside amidships and the third on the quarterdeck.
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