Concept

Border states (Eastern Europe)

Summary
Border states, or European buffer states, were the European nations that won their independence from the Russian Empire after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk and ultimately the defeat of the German Empire and Austria-Hungary in World War I. During the interwar period, the nations of Western Europe implemented a border states policy, which aimed at uniting them in protection against the Soviet Union and communist expansionism. The border states were interchangeably Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania and, until their annexation into the Soviet Union, short-lived Belarus and Ukraine. The policy tended to see the border states as a cordon sanitaire, or buffer states, separating Western Europe from the newly formed Soviet Union. The policy was very successful. At the time, Soviet foreign policy was driven by the Trotskyist idea of permanent revolution, the end goal of which was to spread communism worldwide through per
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