Concept

Faroese language

Summary
Faroese (ˌfɛəroʊˈiːz,_ˌfær- ; føroyskt mál ˈføːɹɪst ˈmɔaːl) is a North Germanic language spoken as a first language by about 69,000 Faroe Islanders, around 48,000 of whom reside on the Faroe Islands and some 21,000 in other areas, mainly Denmark. It is one of five languages descended from Old West Norse spoken in the Middle Ages, the others being Norwegian, Icelandic, and the extinct Norn and Greenlandic Norse. Faroese and Icelandic, its closest extant relative, are not mutually intelligible in speech, but the written languages resemble each other quite closely, largely owing to Faroese's etymological orthography. History Around 900 AD, the language spoken in the Faroes was Old Norse, which Norse settlers had brought with them during the time of the settlement of Faroe Islands (landnám) that began in 825. However, many of the settlers were not from Scandinavia, but descendants of Norse settlers in the Irish Sea region. In addition, women from Norse Ireland, Orkney, or She
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