Concept

CORC

Summary
CORC (the Cornell computing language) was a simple computer language developed at Cornell University in 1962 to serve lay users, namely for students to use to solve math problems. Its developers, industrial engineering professors Richard W. Conway and William L. Maxwell, sought to create a language which could both expose mathematics and engineering students to computing and remove the burden of mechanical problem-solving from their professors. CORC was designed with ease of use in mind. It contained strains of both FORTRAN and ALGOL but was much simpler. Since programs were tediously input with punched cards, the compiler had a high tolerance for error, attempting to bypass or even correct problem sections of code. Students could submit a program by 5 PM which would be compiled or run overnight, with results available the next morning. It was initially run on the Burroughs 220 and later extended to the CDC 1604. In 1966 it was superseded by CUPL, a batch compiler for teaching which
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading