Concept

Wyandot people

Summary
The Wyandot people (also Wyandotte, Wendat, Waⁿdát, or Huron) are Indigenous peoples of the Northeastern Woodlands of North America, and speakers of an Iroquoian language, Wyandot. In the United States, the Wyandotte Nation is a federally recognized tribe headquartered in Wyandotte, Oklahoma. There are also organizations that self-identify as Wyandot, including the Wyandot Nation of Kansas, a nonprofit organization in Kansas City, Kansas, and the Wyandot of Anderdon Nation, a nonprofit organization in Trenton, Michigan. In Canada, the Huron-Wendat Nation has two First Nations reserves at Wendake, Quebec. The Wyandot emerged as a confederacy of tribes around the north shore of Lake Ontario, with their original homeland extending to Georgian Bay of Lake Huron and Lake Simcoe in Ontario, Canada and occupying territory around the western part of the lake. They predominantly descend from the ancient Tionontati (or Tobacco/Petun) people, who never belonged to the Huron (Wendat) Confeder
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading