Concept

Cedar oil

Summary
Cedar oil, also known as cedarwood oil, is an essential oil derived from various types of conifers, most in the pine or cypress botanical families. It is produced from the foliage, and sometimes the wood, roots, and stumps left after logging of trees for timber. It has many uses in art, industry, and perfumery, and while the characteristics of oils derived from various species may vary, all have some degree of pesticidal effects. Sources and characteristics Although termed cedar or cedarwood oils, the most important oils are produced from distilling wood of a number of different junipers and cypresses (of the family Cupressaceae), rather than true cedars (of the family Pinaceae). Similar oils are distilled, pressed or chemically extracted in small quantities from wood, roots, and leaves from plants of the genera Platycladus, Cupressus, Taiwania, and Calocedrus. The cedarwood oil of the ancients, in particular the Sumerians and Egyptians, was derived from the Cedar of Lebano
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