Concept

Golden age of American animation

Summary
The golden age of American animation was a period in the history of U.S. animation that began with the popularization of sound cartoons in 1928 and gradually ended from the late 1950s to early 1970s, where theatrical animated shorts began losing popularity to the newer medium of television animation, produced on cheaper budgets and in a more limited animation style by companies such as Hanna-Barbera, UPA, Jay Ward Productions, Terrytoons, Filmation and DePatie-Freleng. Many popular characters emerged from this period, including Disney's Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck, Goofy, and Pluto; Fleischer Studios' Popeye, Koko, Bimbo, Betty Boop and Superman; Warner Bros.' Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd, Porky Pig, Tweety, and Sylvester; MGM's Tom and Jerry and Droopy; Felix the Cat; Walter Lantz's Woody Woodpecker; Terrytoons' Mighty Mouse; UPA's Mr. Magoo; Jay Ward Productions' Rocky and Bullwinkle; and DePatie-Freleng's Pink Panther. Feature-length animation bega
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading