Concept

Ettore Majorana

Summary
Ettore Majorana (maɪə'rɑːnə, ˈɛttore majoˈraːna; born on 5 August 1906 – likely dying in or after 1959) was an Italian theoretical physicist who worked on neutrino masses. On 25 March 1938, he disappeared under mysterious circumstances after purchasing a ticket to travel by ship from Palermo to Naples. The Majorana equation and Majorana fermions are named after him. In 2006, the Majorana Prize was established in his memory. Life and work In 1938, Enrico Fermi was quoted as saying about Majorana: "There are several categories of scientists in the world; those of second or third rank do their best but never get very far. Then there is the first rank, those who make important discoveries, fundamental to scientific progress. But then there are the geniuses, like Galilei and Newton. Majorana was one of these." Gifted in mathematics Majorana was born in Catania, Sicily. Mathematically gifted, he was very young when he joined Enrico Fermi's team in R
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