Concept

Spanish peseta

Summary
The peseta (pəˈseɪtə, peˈseta) was the currency of Spain between 1868 and 2002. Along with the French franc, it was also a de facto currency used in Andorra (which had no national currency with legal tender). Etymology The name of the currency originally comes from peceta, a Catalan diminutive form of the (Catalan) word peça (lit. piece, i.e. a coin), not from the Spanish peso (lit. weight). The word peseta has been known as early as 1737 to colloquially refer to the coin worth 2 reales provincial or of a peso. Coins denominated in "pesetas" were briefly issued in 1808 in Barcelona under French occupation; see Catalan peseta. Symbol Traditionally, there was never a single symbol or special character for the Spanish peseta. Common abbreviations were "Pta" (plural: "Pts), "Pt", and "Ptas". A common way of representing amounts of pesetas in print was using superior letters: "Pta" and "Pts". Common Spanish models of mechanical typewriters had the expression "P
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