Concept

Cirencester

Summary
Cirencester (ˈsaɪrənsɛstər, ˈsɪstər; see below for more variations) is a market town in Gloucestershire, England, west of London. Cirencester lies on the River Churn, a tributary of the River Thames. It is the eighth largest settlement in Gloucestershire and the largest town within the Cotswolds. It is the home of the Royal Agricultural University, the oldest agricultural college in the English-speaking world, founded in 1840. The town had a population of 20,229 in 2021. The Roman name for the town was Corinium, which is thought to have been associated with the ancient British tribe of the Dobunni, having the same root word as the River Churn. The earliest known reference to the town was by Ptolemy in AD 150. The town's Corinium Museum has an extensive Roman collection. Cirencester is twinned with the town of Itzehoe, in the Steinburg region of Germany. Local geography Cirencester lies on the lower dip slopes of the Cotswold Hills, an outcrop of oolitic limestone. Natura
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