Concept

Benign fasciculation syndrome

Summary
Benign fasciculation syndrome (BFS) is characterized by fasciculation (twitching) of voluntary muscles in the body. The twitching can occur in any voluntary muscle group but is most common in the eyelids, arms, hands, fingers, legs, and feet. The tongue can also be affected. The twitching may be occasional to continuous. BFS must be distinguished from other conditions that include muscle twitches. Signs and symptoms The main symptom of benign fasciculation syndrome is focal or widespread involuntary muscle activity (fasciculation). The benign twitches usually have a constant location. Other common symptoms are generalized fatigue or weakness, paraesthesia or numbness, and muscle cramping or spasms. Anxiety and somatic symptom disorders and symptoms are commonly reported. Muscle stiffness may also be present; if muscle weakness is not also present, and cramps are more severe, th
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