Concept

Restriction digest

Summary
A restriction digest is a procedure used in molecular biology to prepare DNA for analysis or other processing. It is sometimes termed DNA fragmentation, though this term is used for other procedures as well. In a restriction digest, DNA molecules are cleaved at specific restriction sites of 4-12 nucleotides in length by use of restriction enzymes which recognize these sequences. The resulting digested DNA is very often selectively amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), making it more suitable for analytical techniques such as agarose gel electrophoresis, and chromatography. It is used in genetic fingerprinting, plasmid subcloning, and RFLP analysis. Restriction site A given restriction enzyme cuts DNA segments within a specific nucleotide sequence, at what is called a restriction site. These recognition sequences are typically four, six, eight, ten, or twelve nucleotides long and generally palindromic (i.e. the same nucleotide sequence in the 5' – 3' direction)
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading