Concept

Liquid consonant

Summary
In phonology, liquids are a class of consonants consisting of voiced lateral approximants like /l/ together with rhotics like /r/. Etymology The grammarian Dionysius Thrax used the Ancient Greek word ὑγρός (, ) to describe the sonorant consonants (/l, r, m, n/) of classical Greek. Most commentators assume that this referred to their "slippery" effect on meter in classical Greek verse when they occur as the second member of a consonant cluster. This word was calqued into Latin as liquidus, whence it has been retained in the Western European phonetic tradition. Phonological properties Liquids as a class often behave in a similar way in the phonotactics of a language: for example, they often have the greatest freedom in occurring in consonant clusters. Metathesis Cross-linguistically, liquids are the consonants most prone to metathesis. Spanish In Spanish, /r/ is liable for metathesis. More specifically, /r/
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