Concept

Miles Kestrel

Summary
The Miles M.9 Kestrel was a 1930s British single-engined tandem seat monoplane, intended as an advanced trainer. Only one Kestrel was built but it was developed into the Miles Master for the RAF and produced in large numbers at the start of the Second World War. Design and development The Kestrel was Miles' first high powered aircraft and was an aerodynamically clean monoplane with cantilever wings and tailplane. It is not recorded whether it was named after a bird of prey, like many aircraft designed by F. G. Miles, or after its Rolls-Royce Kestrel engine. The Kestrel had thick wings, perhaps influenced by the experiments with the Miles Hawcon, with a root thickness to chord ratio of about 23%. They had inverted gull form, with anhedral inboard, giving way to dihedral on the outer part. The wings carried ailerons immediately outboard of Miles split trailing edge flaps in two sections on each wing. The main undercarriage was attached at the lowest point of the wing, keep
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