Concept

Fairey N.9

Summary
The Fairey N.9 (also known as the F.127) was a British experimental floatplane of the First World War; only one was built. It carried out the first shipborne catapult launches from Royal Navy ships, and was later sold to Norway. Development and design In 1917 Fairey Aviation produced two separate designs to meet Admiralty Specification N.2(a) for a two-seat carrier-based seaplane for the Royal Naval Air Service, one powered by a Rolls-Royce Falcon engine, and a larger aircraft powered by a more powerful Sunbeam Maori. The smaller aircraft, usually known by its serial number N.9, but also by its constructor's number F.127, flew first on 5 July 1917, with the larger aircraft (serial number N.10), the prototype Fairey III, flying in September. N.9 was a compact biplane with single-bay wings of unequal span that folded back for shipboard stowage. It was fitted with trailing edge flaps on both the upper and lower wings. Power was from a 200 hp (149 kW) Rolls-Royce Fa
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