Concept

Dulong–Petit law

Summary
The Dulong–Petit law, a thermodynamic law proposed by French physicists Pierre Louis Dulong and Alexis Thérèse Petit, states that the classical expression for the molar specific heat capacity of certain chemical elements is constant for temperatures far from the absolute zero. In modern terms, Dulong and Petit found that the heat capacity of a mole of many solid elements is about 3R, where R is the universal gas constant. The modern theory of the heat capacity of solids states that it is due to lattice vibrations in the solid. History Experimentally Pierre Louis Dulong and Alexis Thérèse Petit had found in 1819 that the heat capacity per weight (the mass-specific heat capacity) for 13 measured elements was close to a constant value, after it had been multiplied by a number representing the presumed relative atomic weight of the element. These atomic weights had shortly before been suggested by John Dalton and modified by Jacob Berzelius. Dulong and Petit were unaware
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading