Concept

Scyliorhinus meadi

Summary
Scyliorhinus meadi, the blotched catshark, is a little-known species of catshark, and part of the family Scyliorhinidae, found in the western central Atlantic Ocean. It inhabits banks of deep-sea coral at depths of , feeding on cephalopods, shrimp, and bony fishes. This species can be identified by its wide body and head, and the dark saddle-like markings on its back. It also has small spots that fluoresce yellow under a blue light. Adult blotched catsharks have not been observed; the largest immature specimen is long. Like other catsharks, it is believed to be oviparous. This species is not dangerous to humans and has no commercial significance. Taxonomy The blotched catshark was first scientifically described in 1966 by American ichthyologist Stewart Springer, based on a long immature male caught off Cape Canaveral, Florida. He named it after Giles W. Mead, who brought the original specimen to his attention. From 1970 to 1979, this species was regarded as a subspecies of
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