Concept

Fred Langdon Davis

Summary
Frederick Langdon Davis, (August 6, 1868 – April 9, 1951) was a lawyer and political figure in Manitoba, Canada. He represented Neepawa in the House of Commons of Canada as a Unionist member. He was born in Belleville, Ontario, the son of James A. Davis and Sarah Way. Davis came to Winnipeg in 1881 and studied at the University of Manitoba. He articled in law with Frank Stayner Nugent and then William Egerton Perdue, entered practice in 1893 and was called to the Manitoba bar in 1900. He set up practice in Neepawa. Davis was president of the local board of trade and served on the school board. In 1895, he married Elizabeth Ellen Webster. In 1936, he was named King's Counsel. During World War I, Davis spoke out in favour of better treatment of "enemy aliens", persons residing in Canada who held citizenship in countries at war with Canada: If we treat such men as men and brothers, we will make Canadians of them; if we treat them in any other fashion, we will make of them an alie
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