Concept

Earle Wilton Richardson

Summary
Earle Wilton Richardson, (1912–1935) was an African-American artist made famous mainly for an oil painting of his dating from 1934 titled Employment of Negroes in Agriculture. This now iconic picture (size 48 × 32 inches) depicts two male and two female Black cotton workers, one of them a child, in an unidentified Southern state loading cotton into bales. Like many other artworks at the time, the painting was commissioned and financed under the New Deal. Richardson committed suicide the following year. He was born and lived in New York City, NY. "Richardson and fellow artist Malvin Gray Johnson planned to say more about the history and promise of black people in their mural series Negro Achievement, slated to be installed in the New York Public Library’s 135th Street Branch, but neither young man lived long enough to complete the project." "After Johnson's sudden illness and death in November 1934, Richardson continued to work on their mural project. But within a year he too wa
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