Concept

Taizō-in

Summary
is the oldest sub-temple (tatchū) of the Myōshin-ji Rinzai Zen Buddhist temple, situated in the northwest of Kyoto, Japan. It was founded by Zen priest Muinsoin in 1404. The original temple buildings were burned during the Ōnin War (1467-1477), and were later rebuilt. Taizō-in is well known for its two gardens. The main garden, Motonobu-no-niwa, is a traditional Japanese dry landscape garden (karesansui), containing several angular rocks suggesting the cliffs of the island of Hōrai, with smaller stones suggesting a stream. The planting is mostly evergreen, including camellia, pine, and Japanese umbrella pine. It covers 50 tsubo (170 m²) and was designed to integrate a borrowing of scenery ("shakkei") of a view of Narabigaoka Hill in the distance. It is thought to be the final work of Muromachi painter Kanō Motonobu (狩野 元信), reproducing one of his paintings in three dimensions. A new pond garden, or yoko-en, was designed by Kinsaku Nakane in 1963–1966. The new garden is large
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