Concept

Saltash Ferry

Summary
The Saltash Ferry was a ferry across the River Tamar between Saltash, Cornwall and Plymouth, Devon. It was replaced in 1961 by the Tamar Bridge. History There had been a ferry service across this section of the Tamar since the time of the Norman Conquest. At the time, there was no public crossing of the Tamar downstream of Gunnislake, to the north. Initial ferries were powered by oar and ropes. The service was owned by the Valletort family in the 12th and early 13th centuries before being sold in 1270. In 1385, the Burgesses of Saltash were granted a lease to run the ferry for 200 years. In 1733, it capsized and sank, with the loss of 20 lives. The ferry was revived in 1832 by John Parker, 1st Earl of Morley and Sir William Molesworth, who obtain an Act of Parliament authorising a floating bridge steam ferry across the Tamar. It was constructed by James Meadows Rendel the following year, and could accommodate up to four horse c
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