Concept

Gazzi-Dickinson method

Summary
The Gazzi-Dickinson method is a point-counting technique used in geology to statistically measure the components of a sedimentary rock, chiefly sandstone. The main focus (and most controversial) part of the technique is counting all sand-sized components as separate grains, regardless of what they are connected to. Gazzi-Dickinson point counting is used in the creation of ternary diagrams, such as QFL diagrams. Technique To perform a point count using the Gazzi-Dickinson method, a randomly selected thin section from a sedimentary rock is needed, with a slide advance mechanism that will randomly select points on the slide with a petrographic microscope. A minimum of 300 representative points (preferably 500 points) should be used to perform the count. On each randomly selected point that lands on a sand grain, the operator must determine the make-up of the area chosen, i.e. whether it is a mineral grain that is sand sized (larger than 62.5 micrometers) or a finer-grained
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