Concept

Irving Stringham

Summary
Washington Irving Stringham (December 10, 1847 – October 5, 1909) was an American mathematician born in Yorkshire, New York. He was the first person to denote the natural logarithm as \ln(x) where x is its argument. The use of \ln(x) in place of \log_e(x) is commonplace in digital calculators today. "In place of ^{e}\log we shall henceforth use the shorter symbol \ln, made up of the initial letters of logarithm and of natural or Napierian." Stringham graduated from Harvard College in 1877. He earned his PhD from Johns Hopkins University in 1880. His dissertation was titled Regular Figures in N-dimensional Space under his advisor James Joseph Sylvester. In 1881 he was in Schwartzbach, Saxony, when he submitted an article on finite groups found in the quaternion algebra. Stringham began his professorship in mathematics at Berkeley in 1882. In 1893 in Chicago, his paper Formulary for an Introduction to Ell
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