Concept

Always Tomorrow: The Portrait of an American Business

Summary
Always Tomorrow: The Portrait of an American Business is a 1941 American promotional film dramatizing the history of the Coca-Cola company. Plot The film opens with Jim Westlake (John Archer) reflecting on the newspaper headlines about World War II, emphasizing a sense of uncertainty about the future. He says, "Men's souls wrestle with the thought of tomorrow, and today is the eve of tomorrow." His employee Larry Larabee (Johnny Arthur) is worried about the future of their company, but Westlake attempts to placate him by reminding him that the company has survived World War I and the lean years of the Great Depression. Westlake narrates how he became a Coca-Cola bottler and has recently opened a new bottling plant in his town. The scene shifts back several years to the planning stages of the new factory, and Larabee worries about the risk of building a new plant during the Depression. "Right now isn't the time to go sinking a lot of money—" he begins, before a co-worker in
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