Concept

Antigonid dynasty

Summary
The Antigonid dynasty (ænˈtɪɡoʊ-nɪd; Ἀντιγονίδαι) was a Hellenistic dynasty of Dorian Greek provenance, descended from Alexander the Great's general Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-Eyed") that ruled mainly in Macedonia. History In 309 BC, Cassander commanded Glaucias to secretly assassinate the 14-year-old Alexander IV of Macedon and his mother. The Macedonian Argead dynasty became extinct. In 306 BC, after defeating Ptolemy at the naval Battle of Salamis, Demetrius I conquered Cyprus. Following that victory Antigonus I assumed the title of Basileus (King of Alexander's Empire) and bestowed the same upon his son. Antigonus I ruled mostly over Asia Minor and northern Syria. His attempts to take control of the whole of Alexander's empire led to his defeat and death at the Battle of Ipsus in 301 BC. Antigonus's son Demetrius I Poliorcetes survived the battle, and managed to seize control of Macedon itself a few years later, but eventually lost his throne, dying as a pris
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