Concept

Bury, Greater Manchester

Summary
Bury (ˈbɛri ˈbʊri) is a market town on the River Irwell in the Metropolitan Borough of Bury, Greater Manchester, England. which had a population of 81,101 in 2021 while the wider borough had a population of 193,846. The town is within the historic county boundaries of Lancashire. It emerged in the Industrial Revolution as a mill town manufacturing textiles. The town is known for the open-air Bury Market and black pudding, the traditional local dish. Sir Robert Peel was born in the town. Peel was a Prime Minister of the United Kingdom who founded the Metropolitan Police and the Conservative Party. A memorial and monument for Peel, the former stands outside Bury parish church and the latter overlooks the borough on Holcombe Hill. The town is east of Bolton, southwest of Rochdale and northwest of Manchester. History Toponymy The name Bury (also earlier known as Buri and Byri) comes from an Old English word, meaning castle, stronghold or fort, an early form of mode
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