Concept

John Horne Tooke

Summary
John Horne Tooke (25 June 1736 – 18 March 1812), known as John Horne until 1782 when he added the surname of his friend William Tooke to his own, was an English clergyman, politician, and philologist. Associated with radical proponents of parliamentary reform, he stood trial for treason in November 1794. Early life and work He was the third son of John Horne, of Newport Street, Long Acre, Westminster, a member of the Worshipful Company of Poulters. As a youth at Eton College, he had claimed "that his father was an eminent Turkey merchant" implying that, rather than a dealer in poultry, he traded with the Eastern Mediterranean. Before Eton, he had been at school in Soho Square, in a Kentish village, and from 1744 to 1746 at Westminster School. He was blinded in his right eye during a schoolboy fight. On 12 January 1754 he was admitted as sizar at St John's College, Cambridge, and took his degree of B.A. in 1758, as last but one of the senior optimes, Richard Beadon, his life
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