Concept

Attorney–client privilege

Summary
Attorney–client privilege or lawyer–client privilege is the common law doctrine of legal professional privilege in the United States. Attorney–client privilege is "[a] client's right to refuse to disclose and to prevent any other person from disclosing confidential communications between the client and the attorney." The attorney–client privilege is one of the oldest privileges for confidential communications. The United States Supreme Court has stated that by assuring confidentiality, the privilege encourages clients to make "full and frank" disclosures to their attorneys, who are then better able to provide candid advice and effective representation. General requirements under United States law Although there are minor variations, the elements necessary to establish the attorney–client privilege generally are:

The asserted holder of the privilege is (or sought to become) a client; and

The person to whom the communication was made:

is a member of the bar of a cour

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