Concept

Coriander

Summary
Coriander (ˌkɒriˈændər,ˈkɒriændər; Coriandrum sativum), also known as cilantro (sɪˈlæntroʊ,-ˈlɑːn-), is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking. Most people perceive coriander as having a tart, lemon/lime taste, but to some individuals the leaves taste like dish soap. The perception of a soapy taste in certain aldehydes is linked to a specific gene. Botanical description Coriander is native to regions spanning from Southern Europe and Northern Africa to Southwestern Asia. It is a soft plant growing to tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The flowers are borne in small umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the centre of the umbel longer () than those pointing toward it (only long). The fruit is a globular
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