Concept

DEET

Summary
N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide, also called diethyltoluamide or DEET (diːt, from DET, the initials of di- + ethyl + toluamide), is the oldest, most effective and most common active ingredient in commercial insect repellents. It is a slightly yellow oil intended to be applied to the skin or to clothing and provides protection against mosquitoes, flies, ticks, fleas, chiggers, leeches and many biting insects. Unlike icaridin, DEET gives off an odor that many people find unpleasant, leaves the skin greasy and can dissolve plastics and synthetic fabrics. Effectiveness DEET and icaridin are the most effective insect repellents available. DEET is effective against a variety of invertebrates, including ticks, flies, mosquitos, and some parasitic worms. A 2018 systematic review found no consistent performance difference between DEET and icaridin in field studies and concluded that they are equally preferred mosquito repellents, noting that 50% DEET offers longer protec
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading