Concept

Integral geometry

Summary
In mathematics, integral geometry is the theory of measures on a geometrical space invariant under the symmetry group of that space. In more recent times, the meaning has been broadened to include a view of invariant (or equivariant) transformations from the space of functions on one geometrical space to the space of functions on another geometrical space. Such transformations often take the form of integral transforms such as the Radon transform and its generalizations. Classical context Integral geometry as such first emerged as an attempt to refine certain statements of geometric probability theory. The early work of Luis Santaló and Wilhelm Blaschke was in this connection. It follows from the classic theorem of Crofton expressing the length of a plane curve as an expectation of the number of intersections with a random line. Here the word 'random' must be interpreted as subject to correct symmetry considerations. There is a sample space of lines, one on which the a
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