Concept

Brit milah

Summary
The brit milah (בְּרִית מִילָה bərīṯ mīlā, bʁit miˈla; Ashkenazi pronunciation: bʁis ˈmilə, "covenant of circumcision"; Yiddish pronunciation: bris bʀɪs) is the ceremony of circumcision in Judaism. According to the Book of Genesis, God commanded the biblical patriarch Abraham to be circumcised, an act to be followed by his male descendants on the eighth day of life, symbolizing the covenant between God and the Jewish people. Today, it is generally performed by a mohel on the eighth day after the infant's birth and is followed by a celebratory meal known as seudat mitzvah. Brit Milah is considered among the most important and central commandments in Judaism, and the rite has played a central role in the formation and history of Jewish civilization. The Talmud, when discussing the importance of Brit Milah, compares it to being equal to all other mitzvot (commandments) based on the gematria for brit of 612. Jews who voluntarily fail t
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