Concept

Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica

Summary
Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (English: The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy) often referred to as simply the Principia (prɪnˈsɪpiə,_prɪnˈkɪpiə), is a book by Isaac Newton that expounds Newton's laws of motion and his law of universal gravitation. The Principia is written in Latin and comprises three volumes, and was first published on 5 July 1687. The Principia is considered one of the most important works in the history of science. The French mathematical physicist Alexis Clairaut assessed it in 1747: "The famous book of Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy marked the epoch of a great revolution in physics. The method followed by its illustrious author Sir Newton ... spread the light of mathematics on a science which up to then had remained in the darkness of conjectures and hypotheses." A more recent assessment has been that while acceptance of Newton's laws was not immediate, by the end of the century a
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